Hudson Pacemaker 1951

"Fabulous Finnish Hudzzzon"

Reconstructions of Hudsons today are almost certainly dead ringers for Nascar cars of the past unless, of course, they end up in the hands of John Löfbacka from Pietarsaari, Finland, in which case they will be a fully fledged custom built "Fabulous Hudzzzons"!

By: Ulf Forsberg

The Hudson Hornet was the model that swept Nascar raceways during the early 50's. The factory built motor was pretty strong and the new, step down body did wonders for driving stability. The "fab" Hudson Hornet fast became a concept!

However, this concept involved the use of a previous Hudson model as a forerunner.

When John Löfbacka returned from the US to Pietarsaari in Finland in 2009 and apart from rust beneath the car, the Hudson was largely in it's original condition. With just a coat of primer, the Hudson was inspected and up-and-running by the first summer.


However, as usual, when buying a new car, John finds it difficult to keep his hands off! Over the years he's custom built many vehicles, including caravans to match. It wasn't long before the Hudson Pacemaker was transformed into the "Fabulous Hudzzzon". The straight 6-cylinder ironwas discarded and replaced with a recently re-furbished Chrysler 318 together with a Torqueflite automatic transmission.

The car was then shipped across the Baltic Sea to Emil Fahlgren and his company, Metal Madness in Sikeå, Sweden who, together with some mates from Pietarsaari, modified the body properly to give it a tasteful and less conspicuous appearance.

Generally speaking, the body was divided and widened, the roof sectioned and lowered by a few inches however, no more than to allow the original windscreens to be placed into position.

The panoramic or, wraparound rear window, didn't fit, so it was replaced by a much nicer one from a 1941 Lincoln, and with things moving nicely along, the doors were extended to enhance their appearance and the door pillars angled forward.


The old suspension assemblies, both front and rear, were replaced with air ride suspensions and the old floor of the boot completely renewed.


The front wings, indeed the whole front end of the car, is a story in itself!

John considered the front end of the car to be a little to low and decided to cleave the wings lengthwise and angle them slightly upwards. In order to achieve the desired shape he paired the cleaved wings together with two from a 1956 Lincoln, at the same time, modifying the wheel arches to accommodate the raised front end.

The grill was angled in a backward position from the upper to lower edge in order to ensure a perfect fit.

Finally, the front end was fitted with original cow horns taken from the rear of a 1956 Lincoln.


"Just now I'm in the process of rebuilding a 1956 Lincoln and I've already managed to get hold of a lot of parts towards the rebuilding. Together with several mates, many of the ideas we've had have been put to good use during the rebuilding", says John.


You could be forgiven for thinking that John and his buddies have gone wild, as one of the more eccentric ideas has been the introduction of an air cleaner! The original filter mounting was a boring old round black object which frankly, didn't look the part.

The air cleaner is a high-tech contraption consisting of two propane gas bottles that have been reduced in size.

The rear mounted lighting clusters resemble that of a 1959 Cadillac.

John believes that sometimes one tends to create work that is unnecessary however, that's just the way it is!


The interior has also undergone a complete refurbishment! Amongst other things, a painted motif on the interior roof and painted rugs in "zebra" fashion. Boat lighting has replaced the interior lighting however, the steering wheel and instrument panel are original.

Well almost, a few Lincoln parts that were lying around, have been added!...


During the rebuilding it just so happened, that John decided to include a trailer to transport his 1954 DKW Hutz-zycle around.

Basically it's a DKW moped, that due to the shape and/or form of the rear fender being similar to that of the Hudson, would provide a fitting compliment to the hand built, "Fabulous Hudzzzon". Modifications of the moped were limited to the handlebars of a HD, a home built front mudguard, a rebuilt rear cover and a few additional improvements here and there.


In any case, it was equally important for the trailer to retain the elegance of the "Fab Hudzzzon"! A horse box was purchased but unfortunately, due to the deteriorated condition of the chassis, it was unable to be used in it's present condition.

The frame was copied, including a few changes here and there and the hubs of the horse box were able to be utilized.

John and his mates got to work on the chassis and after about five hours of hard yakka, the expended chassis was finally, a thing of the past and a modified alternative in place.


The modified chassis included air suspension that could be operated from within the car and the frame and body of the horse box, mounted upon it.

"Well, we did build it ourselves", commented John! The lines of the trailer were to harmonize with the car so a sketch of the shape and form required, together with a casting in polyurethane, was made before eventually producing the finished article

in fiberglass.

The icing on the cake was the mounting of a hub cap from the front end of a Lincoln V12 so that it gave the finished article the appearance of a Studebaker, from the late 1940's and top of the front bumper, you've guessed it, to that of a 1956 Lincoln.


"If I wish, I can add a tarpaulin to the trailer so that I can use it as a small shelter to creep into however, I'll mostly be using the trailer for the sake of the moped", said John.


As a paint sprayer the paint was mostly mixed by John himself. The car was finished in time to make it's debut at Northern Europe's largest custom trade show, Elmia in Sweden.

Elmia attracts some 80.000 visitors each year, not bad for a country such as Sweden with just nine million inhabitants. The "Fabulous Hudzzzon" attained first prize in "USA Custom Class" together with "Best Decoration" with honour in "Kustom Kemps of America". Heaps of prizes have also been awarded to John for the "Fab Hudzzzon" in his home country, Finland. Something which gives John great pleasure, a sense of pride and the chance for some big noting!

Strewth, why on earth not?


Slow and easy and no problem on long journeys despite the lack of servo assisted steering and brakes. The fact that there still remains one or two minor adjustments to be made e.g. mounting of the air conditioning, to complete the vehicle, wouldn't deter anyone would enjoy driving the "Fabulous Hudzzzon"."Fabulous Finnish Hudzzzon"

Reconstructions of Hudsons today are almost certainly dead ringers for Nascar cars of the past unless, of course, they end up in the hands of John Löfbacka from Pietarsaari, Finland, in which case they will be a fully fledged custom built "Fabulous Hudzzzons"!


By: Ulf Forsberg


The Hudson Hornet was the model that swept Nascar raceways during the early 50's. The factory built motor was pretty strong and the new, step down body did wonders for driving stability. The "fab" Hudson Hornet fast became a concept!

However, this concept involved the use of a previous Hudson model as a forerunner.

When John Löfbacka returned from the US to Pietarsaari in Finland in 2009 and apart from rust beneath the car, the Hudson was largely in it's original condition. With just a coat of primer, the Hudson was inspected and up-and-running by the first summer.


However, as usual, when buying a new car, John finds it difficult to keep his hands off! Over the years he's custom built many vehicles, including caravans to match. It wasn't long before the Hudson Pacemaker was transformed into the "Fabulous Hudzzzon". The straight 6-cylinder ironwas discarded and replaced with a recently re-furbished Chrysler 318 together with a Torqueflite automatic transmission.

The car was then shipped across the Baltic Sea to Emil Fahlgren and his company, Metal Madness in Sikeå, Sweden who, together with some mates from Pietarsaari, modified the body properly to give it a tasteful and less conspicuous appearance.

Generally speaking, the body was divided and widened, the roof sectioned and lowered by a few inches however, no more than to allow the original windscreens to be placed into position.

The panoramic or, wraparound rear window, didn't fit, so it was replaced by a much nicer one from a 1941 Lincoln, and with things moving nicely along, the doors were extended to enhance their appearance and the door pillars angled forward.

A little extra "TLC" but well worth the effort!

The corners of the boot were rounded in customized style and the bumpers removed in order to give the rear end of the car's body a smooth, overall finish.

The old suspension assemblies, both front and rear, were replaced with air ride suspensions and the old floor of the boot completely renewed.


The front wings, indeed the whole front end of the car, is a story in itself!

John considered the front end of the car to be a little to low and decided to cleave the wings lengthwise and angle them slightly upwards. In order to achieve the desired shape he paired the cleaved wings together with two from a 1956 Lincoln, at the same time, modifying the wheel arches to accommodate the raised front end.

The grill was angled in a backward position from the upper to lower edge in order to ensure a perfect fit.

Finally, the front end was fitted with original cow horns taken from the rear of a 1956 Lincoln.


"Just now I'm in the process of rebuilding a 1956 Lincoln and I've already managed to get hold of a lot of parts towards the rebuilding. Together with several mates, many of the ideas we've had have been put to good use during the rebuilding", says John.


You could be forgiven for thinking that John and his buddies have gone wild, as one of the more eccentric ideas has been the introduction of an air cleaner! The original filter mounting was a boring old round black object which frankly, didn't look the part.

The air cleaner is a high-tech contraption consisting of two propane gas bottles that have been reduced in size.

The rear mounted lighting clusters resemble that of a 1959 Cadillac.

John believes that sometimes one tends to create work that is unnecessary however, that's just the way it is!


The interior has also undergone a complete refurbishment! Amongst other things, a painted motif on the interior roof and painted rugs in "zebra" fashion. Boat lighting has replaced the interior lighting however, the steering wheel and instrument panel are original.

Well almost, a few Lincoln parts that were lying around, have been added!...


During the rebuilding it just so happened, that John decided to include a trailer to transport his 1954 DKW Hutz-zycle around.

Basically it's a DKW moped, that due to the shape and/or form of the rear fender being similar to that of the Hudson, would provide a fitting compliment to the hand built, "Fabulous Hudzzzon". Modifications of the moped were limited to the handlebars of a HD, a home built front mudguard, a rebuilt rear cover and a few additional improvements here and there.


In any case, it was equally important for the trailer to retain the elegance of the "Fab Hudzzzon"! A horse box was purchased but unfortunately, due to the deteriorated condition of the chassis, it was unable to be used in it's present condition.

The frame was copied, including a few changes here and there and the hubs of the horse box were able to be utilized.

John and his mates got to work on the chassis and after about five hours of hard yakka, the expended chassis was finally, a thing of the past and a modified alternative in place.


The modified chassis included air suspension that could be operated from within the car and the frame and body of the horse box, mounted upon it.

"Well, we did build it ourselves", commented John! The lines of the trailer were to harmonize with the car so a sketch of the shape and form required, together with a casting in polyurethane, was made before eventually producing the finished article

in fiberglass.

The icing on the cake was the mounting of a hub cap from the front end of a Lincoln V12 so that it gave the finished article the appearance of a Studebaker, from the late 1940's and top of the front bumper, you've guessed it, to that of a 1956 Lincoln.


"If I wish, I can add a tarpaulin to the trailer so that I can use it as a small shelter to creep into however, I'll mostly be using the trailer for the sake of the moped", said John.


As a paint sprayer the paint was mostly mixed by John himself. The car was finished in time to make it's debut at Northern Europe's largest custom trade show, Elmia in Sweden.

Elmia attracts some 80.000 visitors each year, not bad for a country such as Sweden with just nine million inhabitants. The "Fabulous Hudzzzon" attained first prize in "USA Custom Class" together with "Best Decoration" with honour in "Kustom Kemps of America". Heaps of prizes have also been awarded to John for the "Fab Hudzzzon" in his home country, Finland. Something which gives John great pleasure, a sense of pride and the chance for some big noting!

Strewth, why on earth not?


Slow and easy and no problem on long journeys despite the lack of servo assisted steering and brakes. The fact that there still remains one or two minor adjustments to be made e.g. mounting of the air conditioning, to complete the vehicle, wouldn't deter anyone would enjoy driving the "Fabulous Hudzzzon".